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Counterfeit Titleist 718 AP3 Iron Set

We recently received a counterfeit Titleist 718 AP3 iron set, but we were able to identify that they were fake. Below are some comparison photos between the counterfeit iron and an authentic version, as well as some of the factors that helped us identify the inauthentic clubs.

Counterfeit Titleist AP3 718 Iron Set Differences

  • These clubs are pretty good counterfeits. The differences are much more minor at first glance than some of the other examples we’ve had in the past. First, there are a few details on the back of the head that give it away.
    • The “AP3” engraving is very slightly different. On the counterfeit version, the letters are a little thicker. The line connecting the two sides of the “A” is much thicker than the authentic version. The “P” is much more compact. The “3” does not have the same curves as the version on the real club. The “AP3” is stamped higher on the club, just a bit closer in the direction of the sole on the fake club.
    • The club number on the sole is very close, but there are subtle differences that you can see when you compare it to the real thing. The number is a little thicker and smaller.
    • The sole is wider on the authentic version. Notice in the photo below how the sole near the hosel is much thicker on the authentic version. You can also see how the general shape of the back of the head has much sharper, upward angles than the fake.
  • Another thing to note that is common on a lot of counterfeit clubs is the holographic sticker on the shaft just under the shaft label. On all authentic clubs that have holographic stickers, the sticker is usually under the grip on the underside of the shaft, or down by the hosel of the club also on the underside of the shaft. Counterfeiters seem to think that putting in a visible location will fool more people.
  • The most significant and noticeable difference that made it easy to catch this counterfeit set was the shaft band. This is meant to be a KBS Tour 90 FST shaft. A quick comparison to a legitimate version of this shaft shows that the counterfeiter didn’t come close to replicating the shaft band correctly. As you can see in the photos below, the counterfeit band is much wider. The “KBS” text is similar, but has been stretched in comparison to the real thing. The “Tour 90” text doesn’t even come close to matching the legit version. The sizing of all of the text on the band is incorrect. The red color used is also different. A great way to identify counterfeit clubs is through suspicious looking shafts.

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Counterfeit Callaway X Forged 2018 Iron Set

We recently received a counterfeit Callaway X Forged 2018 iron set, but we were able to identify that they were fake. Below are some comparison photos between the counterfeit iron and an authentic version, as well as some of the factors that helped us identify the inauthentic clubs.

Counterfeit Callaway X Forged 2018 Iron Set Differences

  • The details on the back of the head are notably different on the counterfeit club in comparison to the authentic version.
    • The angles of the design around the cavity, near the toe, and along the bottom of the sole are much rounder and not as sharp as the original club.
    • The text in the Callaway logo engraving is incorrect. All of the letters are larger, and the alignment and shape of the letters do not match the accurate version of the logo.
    • The text for the X Forged engraving is much closer to the original club than the Callaway logo, but there are still small differences in the spacing and the font.
  • The face shape is slightly different, especially near the toe, where the counterfeit version has a more rounded and fatter edge.
  • The shorter grooves on the face near the top of the head extend much longer along the face in the direction of the neck on the authentic club than they do on the fake model.
  • The finish on the authentic clubs is a shinier metal than the counterfeit version. You can see in the photos below the authentic club reflecting through the shiny sole, while the more matte finish on the counterfeit gives no reflection.
  • The entire shape and size of the head is very clearly different when held side-by-side. You can see in the photo below of the soles that the sole of the authentic club is much broader, and that the angles are very different in the cavity areas.
  • The N.S.Pro shaft does not match an authentic version of the same shaft. The graphics on the shaft are a different color and the font does not match the authentic version.

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Counterfeit Titleist 716 AP2 Iron Set

We recently received a counterfeit Titleist 716 AP2 iron set, but we were able to identify that they were fake. Below are some comparison photos between the counterfeit iron and an authentic version, as well as some of the factors that helped us identify the inauthentic clubs.

Counterfeit Titleist 716 AP2 Iron Set Differences

  • This is one of the more obvious fakes that we’ve spotted. The design differences with the text on the cavity are very poorly done on the counterfeit. It would be hard to pass these by almost anyone as legitimate.
    •  The most noticeable and poorly done difference is in the “Tungsten” text. On the counterfeit club, this text is a completely different font. The letters are very close together, and it is not italicized. This is a glaringly obvious difference.
    • The AP2 logo isn’t quite as obvious, but there is a subtle difference. The indentions in the “2” on the counterfeit club are very rounded. The real club cuts into the “2” at the top and bottom at a much sharper angle.
    • The Titleist logo in the cavity is a pretty close replicate to the real thing in terms of font, but the finish is more of a matted silver. It is not as shiny as the finish on the authentic logo.
    • There are also slight differences to the text of the word “Forged”, though very minor. The placement of the word is higher, more towards the sole on the authentic club.
    • The black rubber piece inside the cavity with the Titleist logo on it is different. On the authentic version, this piece has eleven raised lines, while the fake club only has nine.
    • A simple eye-test shows how different the angles and sizes of components within the cavity are in comparing the two clubs. All of the pieces within the counterfeit cavity are much smaller and tighter than on the real club.
  • The creator of these counterfeit clubs did a much better job at matching the head shape than they did at getting the details of the design correct. There aren’t any obvious differences that just stand out when comparing the faces. But when viewing from the soles, we can again see the discrepancies.
    • The sole of the authentic club is slightly broader, making for larger overall head size.
    • From the sole, it is easy to see the differences in the cavity again. The components inside the cavity on the counterfeit club do not sit nearly as deep within the cavity as they do in the authentic version.
  • The wear on the sole is consistent with cast clubs, not forged.
  • Another thing to note that is common on a lot of counterfeit clubs is the holographic sticker on the shaft just under the shaft label. On all authentic clubs that have holographic stickers, the sticker is usually under the grip on the underside of the shaft, or down by the hosel of the club also on the underside of the shaft. Counterfeiters seem to think that putting in a visible location will fool more people.
  • The Titleist text on the grips is not straight. The font is clearly off when compared to how this text looks on an authentic grip. The grips also have a strong rubber smell, which is common with counterfeits.

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Counterfeit TaylorMade Burner 2.0 Iron Set

We recently received a counterfeit TaylorMade Burner 2.0 iron set, but we were able to identify that they were fake. Below are some comparison photos between the counterfeit iron and an authentic version, as well as some of the factors that helped us identify the inauthentic clubs.

Counterfeit TaylorMade Burner 2.0 Iron Set Differences

  • The ferrule on the counterfeit clubs is shorter and does not have the silver ring like the original club.
  • The finish on the authentic clubs is a shinier metal than the counterfeit version.
  • The design within the cavity on the counterfeit clubs is embossed differently than on the authentic version. It is not raised as high and is a lighter color.
  • The silver portion on the top of the counterfeit club is larger. The angles cut much wider than on the authentic club.
  • The neck of the authentic clubs has a serial number just above the TaylorMade logo.
  • The TaylorMade logo on the neck of the counterfeit club is inaccurate. The font is different and the specialized “T” is set too far from the rest of the name.

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Counterfeit Titleist 910D2 Driver

We recently received a counterfeit Titleist 910D2 Driver. This club had some obvious differences from the authentic version. While we didn’t have another 910D2 in stock, we were able to compare it with a 910D3. Check below for a description of the differences and a look at some side-by-side comparison photos.

Counterfeit Titleist 910D2 Driver Differences

  • One of the most noticeable signs that this club wasn’t authentic was the poor craftsmanship on the shaft adapter. The adjustable pieces are not aligned and don’t fit together properly.
  • Another obvious difference from the authentic club is in the coloring of the lettering on the bottom of the club. Both the Titleist logo and the 910D2 text are much darker than the authentic version. Even if you did not have another 910D2 to compare it with in person, you could easily spot this by simply comparing it to authentic photos found on Titleist’s website.
  • The font for the loft is very close to the authentic version, but it has some slight differences.
  • The Titleist emblem on the crown is too close to the front edge on the counterfeit club.

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Upcoming Golf Club Releases – August 2019

Upcoming Golf Club Releases

Club manufacturers are announcing new club models, variations, and other equipment updates at an endless rate, and it can be hard to keep up with all of the latest news. We’ve got you covered. Check out some of the upcoming golf club releases for August and September 2019.

TaylorMadeTaylorMade P-790 2019

TaylorMade P790 Irons and UDI Driving Iron

Two years after the first P790 irons were released, TaylorMade is back with an updated 2019 model. This year’s release features a thinner face, smaller blade length, and also 15% extra tungsten in the head to provide players with a higher launch angle. The 4140 carbon-steel faced club will include TaylorMade’s SpeedFoam technology injected into the clubhead, just like the original model.

TaylorMade will also release a new P790 UDI driving iron, featuring the same SpeedFoam technology. The club has been designed with added forgiveness and better ball speeds in mind.

Release date: September 6, 2019.

Price: P790 Irons: $1,399.99 Steel, $1,599.99 Graphite. P790 UDI 2-iron: $229.99.

TaylorMade P790 Ti Irons

TaylorMade is wading into the waters of the ultra-premium market with the P790 Ti. The club is being branded as the “most premium, technically advanced iron” that TaylorMade has ever created. They resemble player’s clubs in appearance, but are actually closer to game improvement irons. Featuring a titanium face, the club has a wider sole, longer blade, and taller face than the new standard P790. A Thru-Slot Speed Pocket design is a major feature of the iron, which gives players a larger sweet spot as a result.

Release date: November 8th, 2019.

Price: $2,800 Steel, $3,000 Graphite.

Cleveland Golf

Cleveland CBX 2 WedgeCBX 2 Wedge

If you’re looking for a new wedge to pair with your game improvement irons, Cleveland has you covered. The new CBX 2 wedge has a cavity back and is designed with maximum forgiveness in mind. With the same groove technology as the Cleveland RTX-4 wedges, the CBX 2 also includes an improved version of the Feel Balancing Technology found in the original CBX. Cleveland is pushing the easy factor with this wedge, above all emphasizing the idea that it should be nearly automatic for most golfers.

Release date: August 30th, 2019.

Price: $139.99 Steel, $149.99 Graphite.

Mizuno

T20 Wedge

Mizuno is bringing back the T-Series in 2019. After going to the S18 model last year, the Japanese club manufacturer has decided to return to the popular T-series that was so popular with the public and on tour. The most notable difference between the T20 and the previous T7 model is the new Hydroflow Micro Grooves. This feature is designed to battle wet conditions on the course, with grooves that maintain spin rates while releasing moisture. Mizuno is also adding Boron into the Grain Flow Forging, which they claim will increase the life-span of the grooves. Three finish options of Satin Chrome, Blue Ion, and Raw will be available.

Release date: September 20th, 2019.

Price: $150.00

MP-20 Irons

Mizuno MP-20Mizuno will follow the popular MP-18 series with the new MP-20 range of irons. The lineup of irons is made up of the MP-20 MB, MP-20 MMC, and MP-20 HMB. The MB blade model is a pure, single piece of carbon steel, while the MMC features a more playable design with a cavity back, a titanium muscle plate, and a tungsten sole weight. The HMB line is a hollow-headed iron, with the cosmetic appeal of a blade and the playability of a cavity back. This Hybrid Muscle Back is the first of its kind in a Mizuno iron line.

Release date: September 20th, 2019.

Price: MP-20 MB: $162.50 per iron. MP-20 MMC & MP-20 HMB: $175.00 per iron.